social media

Making papers accessible to a general audience

In January 2017, we revealed the top 10 most popular Open Access (OA) articles published in 2016 across our Open and Open Select journals. Open Access research can be read by anyone, anywhere, immediately on publication. This allows articles published OA to work up quite a storm (like the above-mentioned articles did last year – being shared via social media, blogged about, and picked… Read more »

16 things you might not know about early career researchers

ECR in the library

What do early career researchers (ECRs) really think about peer review, open access, or Impact Factors? What motivates them to undertake research, how do they choose which journal to publish in, and how do they build their reputation amongst the scholarly community? Recent research from CIBER, an interdisciplinary and independent UK-based research group, analyzes interviews… Read more »

Scholars in social media: an interview with George Veletsianos

“Public scholarship re-envisions the roles and purposes of scholarship, and it is closely aligned to the ethos of the open movement wherein knowledge is not only shared broadly but is also co-constructed…” George Veletsianos is the author of the book Social Media in Academia: Networked Scholars, which examines the day-to-day realities of social media and online… Read more »

“I follow you on Twitter”

In July I had the pleasure of attending the PE Institute in North Carolina. I was invited to give the keynote address because of my work on social media, and because of the sharing community I have become involved in over the last six years on Twitter. When I entered the conference venue I kept… Read more »

Sharing your research findings, boosting your career

I have been recently challenged by the editorial team of the journal Regional Studies, Regional Science (RSRS) to briefly share my ideas and experience on sharing my publications, specifically my article published in the early career section of RSRS on social media platforms. With this post, I aim to share my view on how sharing published research… Read more »

Tweet your research

Twitter can be one of the most valuable tools you can use to publicize your work, reaching people who may never have heard of you or your research before, increasing downloads of your article, citations, and impact.

Blogging: how to make it work

Blogging can hone your writing skills, pushing you to write in a more accessible style. Such a skill is highly valuable as researchers strive to ensure their work has as wide a readership as possible, driving tweets, shares, likes, impact, and citations.