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What research makes the news?

Deciding if your research is right for the media

In an age of fake news, it is now more important than ever to communicate academic research to the public. With rigorous peer review as standard, academic research is the perfect antidote to sensationalism and fake news, and there are many benefits from working with the media for you.

Not all research articles may the grab the attention of a busy and increasingly-pressured journalist however, and some do have a better chance of piqing their interest than others.

Check out our guide below to understand the criteria we use to assess a paper’s suitability for a press campaign.


What makes newsworthy research?

Click on the image to view or download our  infographic

A major breakthrough in the field

Unsurprisingly, a new discovery or a breakthrough which is relevant to the public is high up on the agenda. This mostly happens in science-based papers, but it can apply to other disciplines too.

Impact on society

A journalist’s primary audience is the reader, so research covering an issue which has (or could have) a real impact on the day-to-day lives of the public, is highly in demand.

Recommendations for change

In certain industries, peer-reviewed research that includes robust and evidence-based proposals can get the attention of policy-makers and parliament through the media and bring about real change.

Timely

Certain topics like mental health, education or climate change are high on the public’s radar as they hugely impact modern society, so a new or interesting take on these is likely to be relevant to the media.

Human Interest

In a news landscape that can (at times) be rather bleak, research which has a novelty feel-good factor will often gain good media coverage due to it’s appeal to both journalists and their audiences.


If you think your research would be interesting to the media then pop us a Press Nomination form, and check out our 10 top tips for working with journalists to prepare you for what could be in store.